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republicans are also pushing a bill that would also change the state's rules for electing a president. based on the congressional maps that virginia republicans gerrymandered back in 2012. so the same maps they have created to give themselves permanent majority, permanent victories in nonstatewide elections, they would also use those maps now to allocate virginia's electoral votes for president of the united states. essentially, rigging the presidential vote in virginia, using the exact same means that they have already used to rig the state level votes for republicans in virginia. we are hearing talk about republican plans to change the rules and thus rig the presidential in a bunch of states now. these are all states that tend to support democrats for president, but where republicans now control the state house, and the governorship. and they think they might be able to use that local republican control to change the rules by which those states contribute electoral votes for the presidency. this has very quietly and very quickly become one of the most important political stories in the cou
had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immigration reform, bank regulations, and so on down
. not on trying to organize democrats behind it. >> you know, if they're coming out of the election, there was an enormous amount of energy coming out of the election. tens of thousands of people volunteered their own time to re-elect this president, and as i said before, not just to re-elect this president, but to move an agenda forward. tens of thousands of people organized all over the country, wanting to continue working for change across the country. of the -- everybody that is on the obama e-mail list, we did -- we asked some questions after the election. what do you want to do? how do you want to affect change? we're not done yet. they're not done yet. organizing for action will be a very effective tool. to organize people all over the country. for the president's agenda, to move us forward, whether it's gun control, to protect our children, whether it's climate change, whether it's immigration reform, whether it's to protect our economy and continue going forward for the middle class. these are things that people voteded for, and they want to keep working on them, and also t
an honorary member after the 1994 election. >> the people that listen to ten hours of talk radio a week or more voted republican by a three-two-one margin. those are the people that elected the new congress. that's why this is the limbaugh congress. >> as of today, i think we can finally put this book where it belongs in history. right there. the american people have put the brakes on the conservative train that has run over a lot of people in this country. president obama has laid down a different track for america. the president's inauguration yesterday served as proof of a real movement in this country. we are a society now of tolerance, fairness, and acceptance. the country is not afraid of progressive values, or to say the word, liberal, because most of the country believes in progressive liberal values. a majority of americans believe gay marriage should be legal. most people don't want any cuts whatsoever to social security. even more people want medicare left alone. only 33% want to protect defense spending. on immigration, the majority believes, well, the path for citizenship f
days after a tough re-election victory over republican mitt romney but right back to work for a president getting regular updates on the terror attack in algeria a reminder of the grave threat from al qaeda, one of many looming second-term challenges hanging over the swearing in where the aides say the address will bring the nation together. >> people here in washington need to seek common ground he will make that point. >> there are other signs suggesting the opposite such as defiant tone at the news conference last week and a new group made up of fore campaign aides now planning to pressure congress. >> i was surprised this week to see him transition the campaign committee into an ongoing campaign-style effort to have an impact on the washington debate because it doesn't seem the lesson of the first term that worked out very well. >> those battles begin again on tuesday, for now it is pomp and circumstance. >> starting with vice president biden getting sworn in after 8:00 a.m. because justice sotomayor had to rush to new york city for a book signing. >> we will walk out,
that make this country great. >> i saw that as essentially sort of a bottom line on the election that got him to this day. >> yes. >> maybe a signal about what is to come in terms of the governing fights in washington. >> absolutely. it is quite likely that there will be some give and some compromise. but he is creating a bottom line here beyond which he will not go. and that is a very strong signal for these budget fights to come. but writ more broadly, i was thinking of martin luther king jr. and of equal rights and of the refrain that, you know, our job is not done, what he basically was saying is our journey is not complete, to use his words. >> our journey is not complete. those are the two repeated phrases. our journey is not complete, and you and i as citizens, you and i. >> exactly. this is an exclusive moment. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are recognized as equal under the law. he is talking about doma, the supreme court argument to come. he is surrounded by the supreme court right this. and he talked about stonewall. ta talking about stonewall in
progress in the last election. >> john: here is a comment from the present that should resonate with any remaining mitt romney fans. >> obama: we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the view. we recognize that no matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any time may face a job loss or a sudden illness or a home swept away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other through medicare, and medicaid, and social security, these things do not sap our initiative. they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers they free us to take the risks that make this country great. >> john: david, that couldn't have been more pointed if he turned to paul ryan and said that line directly to him. do you think he was sending a message across the bell? >> i hope he's sending a message. a lot of progressives look at that and say wait a second, is that the same president who was willing to support the change in social security, or is he going to stand firm. the rhetoric sounds good but how does the president act? what a
to enact the redmap scheme for the election in their state in time for 2016. the state's republican governor and majority leader in the senate have said that they support that idea or pennsylvania. the beltway is fix sated on election process. in the meantime if you want to look into it yourself we have built a toolkit on our website. thank you for being with us tonight. >> this is common sense. this conversation is long overdue. there is no reason we can't do this. all out panic from the right wing. president has this king complex. nothing he is propose iing woul have prevented connecticut. >> what the bheep ble[ bleep ] doing? >> the nra has the fight of the century. >> those are crazy people. >> it wasn't about the president's daughters. >> of course it was he mentioned the president's kids. that is so crazy. they are never going to get middle america and they are going to lose this debate. >> today the obama administration took it's campaign outside the white house. >> i know as well as anyone having written the first assault weapons ban that the industry will do whatever they c
, working to desegregate the deep south. >> the fact that obama could be elected again shows that the stone of hope, it came out of the mountain of despair that king spoke of and there is hope. >> reporter: a sentiment likely shared by so many on the mall today, including the man they all came to see. cecilia vega, abc news, washington. >>> and here again, george stephanopoulos, great to spend the day with you. so, did anything happen today that changed the political possibilities? >> i don't think so. one day, one speech cannot dot that. even though this is the day where all of america comes together, and that was one of the big themes of the president's speech. but one of the things i did think we saw today was a very changed president. and this is a very different time and a very different president from the one who took office four years ago. the speech four years ago, a dark speech. for a dark time. we were mired in crisis. the economy beginning to come back. and what you saw today is, the president gave a meditation on freedom and equality. it was a president who else felt free. >> an
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
is apparently one party doesn't understand we had an election in november and they lost. which means that you move on and you let the president be the president of the united states. these guys still want to fight the old battles of 2012. >> but they're giving this extension now. >> a three-month extension. the white house should tell them to go shove it. you can't run a government three months at a time. you have to have a long-term planning. bad for the markets. bad for the country. bad for the economy. let's make clear, definitive decisions. you lost. let's come together and compromise. pass the debt ceiling and talk about spending cuts if that's what you want to talk about. >> i want to read what "the washington post" conservative columnist had to say about the republican strategy. here's what he said. he wrote, obama's post-election arrogance and intransigence can put you in a fighting mood. i sympathize. this is what he's telling the republicans but i'm tending toward the realist view. don't force the issue when you don't have the power s. that what we're seeing with the debt kreeling i
with everything even though they have a bad rating, it doesn't affect their chance of being re-elected. unfortunately, they have been stacking in state legislatures and in the house of representatives, all of these anti-choice laws that are every egregious wiggle they can come in. none of them, by the way would stand up against roe v. wade because there are so many price of concerns in the fetal heart beat bill. they're adding things like she has to be taped listening to it. the fact she's in the office being scrutinized or filmed while she's getting a medical procedure or -- >> it is a violation of privacy. >> hal: it is absurd. >> they do things even so much as -- i don't know if it's law necessarily or if it's just the doctor's preference to find out how far along the woman is but they'll have you get a sonogram and that can be traumatic. >> yeah. >> just making that decision, having to see what is growing at that moment can be traumatic for a woman. unless you're in that position, it is inappropriate for someone to make that change on your behalf. >> hal: i believe that to be the g
said given the opportunity, we've looked at both sides and, mr. president, you do what you were elected to do. that's why the president can say we're not going to negotiate with debt ceiling, and if the republicans insist on doing it, he is going to go to their constituents, the american people. i have never felt better. >> the president also said on monday, and i'm quoting him, we remember the lessons of our past when twilight years were spent in poverty and parents of a child with a disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that in this country freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the few. why on earth can't paul ryan, speaker boehner, and the rest of them agree with that statement? what is wrong with that encompassing the people of this country rather than dismissing so many people as takers? why can't they agree with those statements of the president? >> because they agree with the statements by mitt romney, that half of the country are takers, half of them are people that don't contribute to society, half of them don't deserve the benefits that they're entitle
they're worried about their elections. i think that in the center of the country and the red states where these senators are running, they don't think that the president's message works, and they're going to try to move themselves away from that because they're worried about it. they're worried about all these -- >> we're talking about the majority of the country though. if the majority is with the president, is he too liberal? that's what i'm asking. can you call the guy too left when he's right where the middle is? how can you keep saying that? it's the only question i want to put to you. if more than 50% support equality of marriage, more than 50% support a woman's right to choose, if more than 50% are with him on guns and foreign policy, how can you call that the far left? >> let me put it this way, the fact of the matter is this is going to be politically very problematic for harry reid because for the constituency he represents in the senate, they're not going to be able to get a lot of things that the president wants done because it's too far to the left of him. for example,
to be on saturday night live. look, look, it's a troll. we see trolling sometimes in elected officials, too. when a politician says something deliberately provocative in front of an audience because they're banking on firing up a smaller group of people who enjoy the way that speaker can make that other audience feel. congressman steve king is kind of a permanent troll. >> we could also electrify this wire with the kind of current that wouldn't kill someone but would simply by a discouragement from them. we do that with livestock all of the time. >> comparing imgrants to livestock and using a visual aid to do so on the house floor. here's another. >> a poet once said life can be a challenge, life can seem impossible, but it's never easy when there's so much on the line. >> he was trolling the entire democratic process at that point. here's oolt. trolling. congressman allen west, former congressman allen west begging america please be out raged by me, please condemn me. i live to cause pointless out rage. i am a troll. the thing about trolling is that the troll, by definition, is not serious. they
and i think generally speaking i think keep kids of ehe lektlek elected officials out of politics, do you agree. >> i agree. >> sean: but i mentioned major hasan and it didn't fit in the narrative. >> anytime you use children in any context, it's a dicey proposition and you have to be careful and the president and his children are in a different category. >> sean: i thought it was creepy and exploited. >> and you use the children in campaign ads and certainly in 2008 with joint interviews with michelle and so on. he also used at least one child when he signed obamacare, the health care bill into law so he has been known to use children as props. the reason today was different in this particular case, sean, because you're dealing with an issue that involves violence and especially violence against children, so to have those children there and to sort of drape himself in it, is sort of cynical. how can you argue against children? you can't. >> sean: one of the things that bothers me the most in this leslie, we rightly protect our presidents, our mayors, our cabinet officials, hollywood
. >> this was an inaugural address where the president came out said i won the election and i'm going to be aggressive in the second term about pushing my agenda. >> and i think we had a clarifying moment and the president's speech put to rest, put to rest the idea that barack obama is a moderate. barack obama is a liberal. >> i don't think that absolutism, i'm sure the president would say the same, on the part of either party or any politician is helpful in terms of solving problems and obviously, if we're going to move forward we're going to have to find a way to come together to solve these problems. >> now dually reelected, he intends to pursue the course of that liberalism. he's going to pursue it as if he had from the election an enormous mandate. >> when i heard that was a liberal speech, i don't think it was a liberal speech, i think it's a popular speech. >> and the battle lines are clearly drawn and i don't think there's hope of-- barring unforeseen developments, that we'll have the unity that people in washington wished for so long. >> we believe strongly there are areas in common that we c
that elected him is the next america, the rising generation and he spoke directly to and for them. it was a new american progressivism unleashed. >> for we, the people, understand that our country cannot succeed when a shrinking few do very well and a growing many barely make it. we will respond to the threat of climate change knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. our journey is not complete until no citizen is forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. >> and you could see in the vast crowd this was a moment won after fierce id logical combat and hard political work. before the speech we spent some time among them. >> these are some of the best seats for the inauguration. who gets them? spouses and members of the house of representatives and they are great seats. just a few yards from where the president takes the oath of office. others who get this close? big donors for sure, the well connected and old friends. >> well, in most ways he's still the same guy. >> the same guy you knew? >> a heart as big as the world. >> john bellcastor w
was popular in the re-election, he was in a difficult fiscal cliff negotiation where he got the tax increases he wanted. the democrats arenited but he faces such quick battles particularly over the debt and over gun legislation that he'd like to pursue, there isn't much of a reset, not much of a honeymoon because there's a carryover of toxic atmosphere in washington when it comes to getting big things done. >> you covered the white house about two terms of the bush administration. what does the president, what is the hard reality of his second term in. >> well he builds up a lot of political capital with re-election and that's very freeing for a second term president but the calendar is short. you have a limited amount of time to really drive the agenda and the president would like to get big things done from immigration to energy, but he's going to be facing trench warfare with republicans over the budget, for some time to come. i think that's going to overshadow most of what he does. >> david gregory thanks very much. >>> when "nbc nightly news" continues on this saturday, new research abou
: actually, think about the demographic politics of the last election. what do all of the broad array of critics not just those ones but what do they have in common? aside from the obvious -- they're all white. they're all male. now, of course, not every white male thinks the same way that they do. but it is notable that this virulent anti-regulation bunch the folks who have been the first shakers not just rush limbaugh, but the folks in congress too they're made up of mostly that same demographic group. in fact, those demographics mirror the nra itself. the nra's board is 87% male and 93% white. the nra's wayne lapierrre keeps insisting his group is bipartisan but take a look at this. the overwhelming majority of congress members with an "a" rating from the nra are republicans. on the other end of the spectrum, the fs are almost entirely democrats. a little sliver of red there you can barely even see it. and of course, the funding follows accordingly. 97% of nra funds went to republican in the last election. but it seems like the nra is not only not representative of the full america
and school safety. a night to remember for the obamas and for the nation that re-elected the president. i'm steve handelsman, nbc news, washington. >>> president obama never used the words "democrat" or "republican" in his second inaugural address, but his political message was clear, progressive policies along with a directive for leaders that define us as individuals and as a country. >> the commitments we make to each other through medicare and medicaid and social security, these things do not sap our initiative, they strengthen us. they do not make us a nation of takers. they free us to take the risks that make this country great. we will respond to the threat of climate change. knowing that the failure to do so would betray our children and future generations. we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. and we must be a source of hope to the poor, the sick, the marginalized, the victims of prejudice. our journey is not complete until our gay brothers and sisters are treated like anyone else under the law. our journey is not com
cannot-- they still cannot get over. they couldn't get over the first election. they're still shocked at the second election, to use a pun, shell shocked. >> sean: and mr. johnson, i have a wild thought perhaps the n.r.a. disagrees with the president's policies because she represent an assault on the second amendment to the constitution. and more, new york congressman charlie rangel said that the races in the south are to blame for the lack of gun laws in that region. >> new york in a the lot of areas and some of the states and some of the southern areas have cultures that we have to overcome. >> sean: so, with reaction to this the entire gun control showdown, author, attorney, david limbaugh and fox analyst, juan williams, juan, your reaction? >> well, i don't think that this is about the president's race, but i think that race has a lot to do with this conversation and that's why i think you have congressman johnson from georgia, saying, hey, look, if you look across the south, high membership in the n.r.a., high amount of gun ownership, principally among whites and in fact, mostly
affair particularly or the love fest from republican elected officials. >> i want to talk a little bit more about the hearing yesterday. i also thought what she comported herself incredibly well and for the most part was composed. i can't imagine having to do that for five and a half hours. it was actually pretty impressive. one of the moments that we showed earlier that fiery exchange of senator johnson and that moment where she asks, when's the difference at this point? you know, really, went over well with the supporters and many others found it pretty offensive and potentially damaging. obviously, the difference is the whole point about this and informs the foreign policy and the difference maybe why a filmmaker is currently in jail and we agreed that the moment was sort of like a rorschach test. if you like her, that's a great victory. maybe if you don't you saw that as pretty damaging. what are you hearing on the hill from democrats and republicans about that particular moment and any sort of long lasting affects it might have? >> well, clearly, that was the one moment the republ
. >> they were playing election politics. no doubt about it. >> this is the lance armstrong principle of when you're in traubl yell at the person asking you the question. >> the republicans did not examine her with enough aggression. >> i would have relieved you of your post. >> madam secretary, you let the consulate become a death trap. >> it was a good way of having to get out of having to respond to me. >> i was responding to a question soledad. i probably speculated and i shouldn't have. >> the doosy-doo. >>> we begin with a state of transition for american foreign policy as senator john kerry faces a high-stakes job interview to be the secretary of state. kerry's confirmation hearings were rather cordial hosted by the foreign relations committee which he's led for the past four years. but it was an unexpected moment when the hearings were interrupted by a protester that offered perhaps the most telling revelation about the man and the moment. >> i'm tired of my friends dying. i don't know if they're going to be alive the next day. >> when i first came to washington and testified, i obviously
far away from washington, d.c. he is in la jolla, the first not to hold an elected d.c. spot at the time that would have made it logical for him to be in town. >> stephanie: poor loser. >> and it is the anniversary of roe v. wade. 70% of american believe the ruling should be upheld. this is the first time in ten years a majority has indicated support. we're back after the break. ♪ hand of government" ... i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really? you're going to lay people off because now the government is going to help you fund your healthcare. really? i want to have those conversations, not to be confrontational, but to understand what the other side is saying, and i'd like to arm our viewers with the ability to argue with their conservative uncle joe over the dinner table. [ voice of dennis ] allstate. with accident forgiveness, they guarantee your rates won't go up just because of an accident. smart kid. [ voice of dennis ] indeed. are you in good hands? from silver screens... to flat screens... twizzlerize your entertainment everyday
a break, every president, their first presidential decision actually happens before they're elected. that is their choice of vice presidential running mate. when i saw what was to become president obama make that decision, knowing joe biden, i was so impressed by the quality of that decision. we have to take a break, we'll talk more on the dancing, there is an evolution, they started off stiff. it was like watching steve kornacki. but they got better. we'll be right back, our dancing with the president's analysis coming up. [ male announcer ] citi turns 200 this year. in that time there've been some good days. and some difficult ones. but, through it all, we've persevered, supporting some of the biggest ideas in modern history. so why should our anniversary matter to you? because for 200 years, we've been helping ideas move from ambition to achievement. and the next great idea could be yours. ♪ >>> it is dancing night for the obamas, and they started off a little stiff. this is their first dance. and krystal ball, i was waiting for them to start dancing. and this is what they did,
. the results and the impact of the recent election. we've got all of that to cover and we will right here with the help of team press this morning. peter ogborn and dan henning leading up the battle. >> good morning. >> bill: phil backert's got the phones. and cyprian bowlding our videographer extraordinaire on the video cam. >> happy thursday. >> bill: what's up, guys. big news is it has snowed in washington for the first time this winter. >> for the first time in like two winters by the way. >> bill: we had no snow at all last winter. and it was cold yesterday man. it was really cold. and this time we had -- you can't say it was much more than a dusting right? about an inch? >> i would say about an inch. >> we got an inch. covered the roads. >> bill: looks pretty. >> yeah. >> bill: but not enough to snarl -- one would hope, not enough to snarl traffic or close the schools or the government. >> federal government is on unscheduled leave today. >> bill: get out of here. >> unscheduled leave or telework. >> you overestimate -- >> bill: that's ridiculous. i didn't even have to put on my sno
have seen from the president in the weeks and months since he won election is a very aggressive stance in dealing with republicans. the quote that really stuck out to me is we cannot mistake absolutism for principal or treat name calling as reasoned debate. those are words that make clear he is ready for a fight and he is not going to be back away from it. he seems to be changing his pattern with the way he deals with senate in his second term. he is trying to make clear that he is done with it. i don't know if he is in fact done with it because a lot of things happen between the principals that you lay out in a speech and what you do when it get tos time to govern. so he is going to have a lot of negotiation going on, and some negotiating away from the principals that he has laid out. he said he has changed his position that he said he wouldn't change at all on the tax line. but he seems to be taking a very different approach. >> jennifer: hank i want to play a sound bite. take a listen. >> obama: our journey is not complete until all of our children from
said the department of homeland security ordered ice to delay that arrest until after the election. >> do you know specifically, as you reported specifically who that person was who made the decision to hold off on the arrest of this illegal intern in the centsenator's offe until after the election. >> no, i don't have, a piece of the puzzle i don't have yet and internal documents don't provide specific names, just the time trail, if you will, of when particular events occurred. >> why was it-- what made him illegal? >> he had arrived in the united states in the '90s on a visitor visa that allowed him to stay in the country for six months, and he overstayed that visa, as many do. the problem of visa overstays as you well know is one that's become a tricky issue. the department is trying to go back and figure out who is in the country based on these expired overstays of visas, and this is one of those situations where this young man arrived in florida in the '90s with his family and overstayed that visa. >> does he have any criminal history? >> he does,'s a registered sex offender i
at the bit. sitting at the edge of the seats. they want to elect women. i see that here in my race in new york city and women are ready. when you see the debt crisis, we need more women in office and washington to simply get things right. >> we need more women in washington and in office. i totally agree with you. we won't end up, steve, with an all white male democratic primary. i want to see a female president. i want to caution against knowing what a mind will do because of the body attached to it. are we assuming that every woman politician is great for woman? what an a woman anti-feminism, anti-choice, would we almost that? >> 2016! >> female equivalent of what clarence thomas is for black people? we won't want that. we want a politician good for women's issues as much as a woman to break that barrier. >> can i just say, poor joe biden? everyone is clamoring for hillary to win. he is the current vice president. and if she doesn't now, democrats are saying, who else can we find? i'd be like, i'm right here, people. look at me. can't catch a break. >> thank you for being with us. >> th
. >> cenk: you would be wrong about that, because we just had an election and it turns out we're not center right we voted for the liberal agenda. somebody wake that guy up. really important in sports, internet pioneer and activist committed suicide because the government was coming after him. amazing new information about that. we're going to have his lawyer on the show to talk about it. >> i know this case was weighing heavily on his mind and a significant source of stress for him. >> yes he stole information but it was not worth what they were putting him through. >> cenk: turns out that the government might have another reason because schwartz might be a wikileaks source. it's go time. [ ♪ theme ♪ ] >> cenk: multiple people have been shot at a school in houston, texas. >> shots fired at the loan star college, multiple shots fired at this college and that at least four people have been shot. >> i heard so much like a guy got shot in the legs. i don't know if somebody got killed. >> this government infringes on our second amendment right, we will do everything we can to push back agai
more than just an election. right? if the n.r.a.'s got a list, then obama for america has a bigger list. >> cenk: i like that. >> i love that line. >> cenk: him saying ok, you've got a list, you think you've got a list, you want to see a list. second of all we've been saying the president should make his case throughout his first term. here he is aggressively making his case. >> there's no politics for him here. he's not running for anything else. he can go out there speak to the people to the congress. of course then, there are the republicans. he has to run into the republicans, he has to run into the crazies. as helpful as the n.r.a. is when a president tries to restrict gun rights, it is just as helpful to the people like the brady campaign and people who are fighting guns when they see some of these crazy people like we see in marco rubio. >> does he really think banning assault weapons is going to stop mass murder? >> he believe that is, i think he believes in this and thinks this is huge. >> he's not a hypocrite he really believes his public policy. >> i think the president is no
and medicaid fantastic. that's why he won the election, and he's repeating it again. but look at the reaction. in the middle of that speech he's negotiating with the republicans on possibly reducing medicare medicaid and possibly reducing social security. i'll judge him by his actions not on his words, even though they were great today. final one classic president obama, and what he emphasizeed throughout the campaign, for better or for worse, i like the words. let's see if he follows through on action. here he is again. >> obama: fidelity to our found founding principles requires new responses to our new challenges, preserveing individual freedom ultimately requires collective action. now more than ever we must do these things together as one nation, one people. my fellow americans we are made for this moment, and we will see so long as we seize it together. >> cenk: this moment, i hope so. i hope we can seize it together. the republicans, of course, have not always been willing to work together. that's not how president obama deals with it. that's an interesting topic one that we'll discuss
, and putting off this testimony to after the election. she's on her way out. she was able to get a lot of love from the democrats there. she's off and it will be brought up again and again and again by the right that's for sure. >> cenk: lindsay, quick thought? >> well, you know it is playing politics with this tragedy and i mean, i think hillary clinton gave great testimony today and defended her position. in her defense i mean, george tenant who was at the helm at the worst intelligence failure of our time and then led us into iraq with faulty intelligence. he never had this kind of grilling. he got a presidential medal of freedom in 2004. >> cenk: i remember when the republicans were outraged about that. no, i don't because that never happened. lindsay moran and michael hastings, you guys are great. thank you for joining us. >> thanks. >> thanks. >> cenk: when we come back i love this story. this is about how wall street got away with the biggest crime and there is great evidence of it. martin smith from front line joins us next. >> it was probably a game among the people in the mortgage bu
this would look right before the election, they denied it over at homeland security and categorically denied it and now ap says it has the internal documents to prove it. and joining me is the chief counsel for the center of law and justice. this story, it's hard to get your arms around how many things went wrong here, we have an illegal immigrant who is a child molester, who is volunteering in the office of a u.s. senator and first, the senator's office says, well, we didn't know any of that because he was unpaid, so we never checked the social security number. there was no way for us to know is what they say. let's table that for now and talk about the fact that it appears no one other than the associated press, now judicial watch and i guess senator chuck grassley has taken interest thanks to the ap. >> right. >> megyn: where is the inspector general, the white house, the administration to try to see whether this actually happened? >> yeah, nowhere to be found is the answer to that and i think that what senator grassley did in his letter and request, as well as judicial watch in their doc
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